The online gambling industry has grown tremendously since its start in 1996 and is currently valued at $35 billion with even more room for growth. From the first web-based wager in 1996 to its current status as a global market encompassing 85 countries, RightCasino.com has charted all these key events and more in their latest infographic. Internet gambling was made possible by a small Caribbean nation, the sector went from boom to bust in five years, and now new technology has revived online gambling. The new age of online gambling combines mobile play with social gambling and new, innovative types of gameplay, enabled by mobile games and technology platforms (like ours) continue to evolve.

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The State of Online Gambling

Despite the roadblocks being thrown up by some very well funded lobbying efforts from some on the land based casino side, online gambling is moving forward. In the US, three states have legalized online gambling, and nine more have introduced legislation to legalize. We think that the progress of online gaming means more than just online profits. We think online gambling can also be a shot of adrenaline for land-based casinos, both by attracting new audiences and by bringing innovative new entertainment options to casino floors. In fact, we’ve based our business model on it. Here is a market-by-market look at the current state of online gambling in New Jersey, Nevada, Delaware, US Virgin Islands, and the UK.

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The past several years have seen explosive growth, more and more developers entering the market, and more games for consumers to choose from than ever before. 2014 will even more interesting as competition for a player’s attention and interest is at a peak – and it seems that the year ahead will bring even more content, leaving individual developers searching for ways to stand out and stay ahead of the game.

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An article in VentureBeat this week features a new report from SuperData which confirms the moment we’ve all anticipated, or dreaded, is here: mobile gamers cost more than they’re worth. In October the cost of acquiring a new smartphone or tablet gamer exceeded the average revenue companies got from that player. Further, SuperData estimates that game developers need to retain players for two or more months before they become profitable.

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